Home Singers and their Kids SHAWN STOCKMAN TALKS ABOUT FATHERING A CHILD WITH AUTISM

SHAWN STOCKMAN TALKS ABOUT FATHERING A CHILD WITH AUTISM

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Shawn Stockman of the R&B group Boyz II Men is one of several celebrities to have a child battle with autism. The recording artist recently discussed his experience as a father having to cope with the disorder.

PHOTOS: See More Photos Of Shawn And His Kids

Stockman described the revelation of his son Micah,9, developing autism as drastic. As he explains, “Micah was the first one to talk, the first one to walk. I didn’t know what to do. One thing a man hates when it comes down to his family is not knowing what to do.”

VIDEO:Shawn Stockman’s And Wife Talk About Their Connection To Autism

Shawn has learned a few things about autism and possible treatments since being informed of his son’s condition eight years ago but such information did not come cheap. “We learned through our journey with Micah just how fortunate we were having money,” Shawn says, “There’s no way a normal couple or a single mom could afford this.”

Although he has overcome much in dealing with Micah’s disorder, Stockman has not yet coped with the idea of his son carrying out an independent life one day. “All you want for your sons is to grow up and develop a life of their own. To know that it may not happen for my son Micah is extremely hurtful,” says Shawn.

Photo shows Shawn(in middle) with his son; actor Jaleel White with his daughter; and Boys II Men members at both ends.

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26 COMMENTS

  1. Awesome. We need to bring awareness on all levels to how we can protect and nurture children and adults with autism. There’s an alarming increase in abuse against autistic people in this country. Nancy Grace and Dr. Drew have shown shocking videos of abuse of autistic adults.

  2. As a mother with 2 autistic sons I have to say that Shawn (Also my husband and older son’s name) is correct that it’s hard for a family or single parent to afford the treatments that is available. The thing is the treatment for Autism isn’t really medicine it’s mostly theraphy such as speech, ot, or other behavior type treatments and those aren’t covered by insurance. So my husband and I have used savings and government programs that help special needs children. In Michigan where I live they just past a law that won’t take effect until October that all insurances have to cover Autism. Not all states have this so if you see it on the ballot or someone ask you to sign a petition to get it put on please research it and sign. You may not need it but with 1 out of 110 kids having autism I sure you know someone who does!

      • They were 3 and 4….their 8 and 9 now my youngest is non verbal while my oldest has limited verbal skills he mostly repeats what you say there’s no one on one conversation. They’ve come a long way but still have a ways to go but you know we as parents do what we have to do!

        • Absolutely! I commend u so much dealing with 2 babies that have autism! Stay strong and I wish u and them continued success in dealing with autism!

        • I commend you LaTanya. My son’s not autistic but is special needs & as a single parent it’s hard. I’m glad you have a husband to assist you but I can see it’s stil 2 vs 2 in the household. I bow to you.

  3. See Shawn himself said it there’s no way a normal couple or single mother could afford this! So what happens when this situation occurs that child suffers! Both kids r beautiful!

  4. Jaleel’s daughter is cute, and she has his eyes! I’m glad Shawn is coming out, and talking about his son. It’s nice to hear a dad’s perspective.

  5. My heart goes out to Shawn and his family…but God knew Micah, was in great hands when he turn him over to Shawn and his wife. Keep the faith.

  6. Having a special needs child is a hard task as a parent & as a single mom, it’s even harder. However, our children will be fine as they have the right parent(s) for the job. My son is & will be independent. It may take him a bit longer than others, but he will aceive it.

      • Hey Pisces! Thank you, I do appreciate it. Have fast fingers & didn’t see I misspelled achieve above. My little man makes me the best person I can be.

        Have a blessed & wonderful weekend. Enjoy Cinco de Mayo!

    • Not trying to be funny, but please tell me how to make it possible? My godson has been diagnosed, the school makes it sound hopeless sometimes, and we are all struggling to find his eventual avenue to independence. He seems so happy in “his world,” he’s progressing in life skills, but sometimes I just want to run out and buy him that happy self-sufficient ending he so richly deserves! Any insight on how to best deal with their prognosis is appreciated.

      • I didn’t take your comment to be funny. My son isn’t autistic, but is on the spectrum as they like to say; multiply disabled, as he has more than one disability. When my son was born, doctors told me I was lucky he survived being born at less than 2lbs & he would be wheelchair bound his entire life, not speaking nor doing anything ‘normal’ children do. I did not accept that & started to teach my son how to do things. I mean everything that people take for granted. I started from birth & haven’t stopped. For example, I taught my son to crawl by placing my hand & knees over his hands & knees & crawling until he could do it himself. Then I enlisted the help of physical, occupational, speech therapists from 18mnths. I would watch what they did & I would copy it at home. We had workbooks for school at home, we had outings for social skills, etc. I worked overnights & dedicated days to his care. My whole life was my son, so it wasn’t easy. I don’t have any other children so it was a bit easier to completely focus on him. For yrs that was how we lived. Now my son is turning 16 & is as close to being ‘normal’ as he can. He not only walks, talks, is independent, responsible, but he plays sports, basketball (#1 shooter on his team), soccer, bowling league, runs track & holds the #1 Javlin spot as we speak. He can cook, clean, use a computer better than many adults can & is great in graphic arts. He no longer uses nor needs those therapists, but still attends a special needs school. It takes faith, God in the forefront of your life, dedication, patience, perseverance, love & lots more patience. We still have more to go, but I believe God blessed me with the perfect teenager.

        My son is farther along than most of the other children in his private school, but he has empathy & a need to help others. It’s very, very hard & school isn’t there to help much. Not all children can live the independent, ‘normal’ adult life but my son will if we have to die trying :). My advice, hang in there, don’t give up, it’s not as bleak as it looks, don’t be hard on yourself, teach & teach your child, accept him & his limits as they are & set up a group of supportive people around him. Parents of special needs children are the best people one can come across.

        • Wow Sherley you should be proud of all the goals your son have reached. The Lord knew what he was doing when he placed the two of you together! Thank you for setting such a great example of what a dedicated parent can accomplish……God bless you and your son!

        • God Bless you, Sherley and may the Lord continue to wrap His loving arms around you and your family, especially your precious son! I appreciate your heartfelt sharing. Hugs!

          • @Pisces..thank you! God sure knew what he was doing when he placed us together & I thank Him everyday for his blessing.

            @Oxford..thank you! I do take care of myself as much as I can, but I have time for that. When my son is grown & married, I’ll have all the time in the world to do just me. For now..it’s all good.

            @Misunderstood..I’m sure LaTanya will tell you, when your children are your life, it shows in them.

            This weekend my son had a track meet & he rocked! Took 1st place in 50 meter, 100 meter, Javlin & 2nd place in relay. His determination, joy & pride were all I needed to have a great Mother’s day! I’m so proud! He woke up that day & said, “I don’t think I’m going to run too fast today”. I said, “just do your best. I’m already proud.” This is what he gave me! Love it!

        • Wow Ms. Sherley, your son is very fortunate to have you and vice versa. I hope at the end of the day that YOU are taking care of YOU too. Just…please take care of yourself too.

          • @Sherley and LaTanya u both ROCK! U both should pat urselves on the back! Ur kids r better due to having loving parents like urselves!

        • Will do Sherley! TOO many people love that little guy to allow stumbling blocks that we have the power to remove! Blessings to you and to your son, and congrats on EVERY accomplishment he has made – big or small!!!! :)

  7. It’s wonderful that more and more parents are forthcoming with sharing personal information about autism and how it affects their families. It can only help in advancing awareness about a disorder that is affecting more and more people every day.

    Nice photo, too. Like.

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